The Role of the Academic Advisor

On 19th March over 60 staff from across The University came together for a fascinating, and we hope, really useful, event focused on The Role of the Academic Advisor.

Since The University initiated the change from Personal Tutor to Academic Advisor there has not been a university wide opportunity to wrestle with the impact of the change, how it is working, and especially to think about issues such as; what works well? What could be better? How can we ensure equity for students? How do staff and students get the information they need to support their academic and personal development? How could we use the resources such as Liverpool Life to support staff to support students? And, sneaking in at the end, what are the implications of the Higher Education Achievement Record?

We would like to thank the following people for their presentations:

  • Leah Ridgway, Electrical Engineering and Electronics: A personal view of her role as Academic Advisor.
  • Matt Murphy, Carnatic Hall Warden: Arguing for closer ties between the halls, as a transition point for students, and academic departments.
  • Jonathan Iggo, Chemistry: Looking at the role of personal tutor within the context of a department wide approach.
  • Janet Strivens, Centre for Lifelong Learning: The role of Academic Advisers in relation to assessment and feedback.
  • Warren Barr, School of Law and Social Justice: The Academic Advisor as a major gateway to engaging students with the huge variety of services and opportunities offered by the University of Liverpool.
  • Jo Sharp, School of Health Sciences: On a structured, whole school, approach to Academic Advising and support for personal development planning.
  • Freya Jarman, Music: The role of the Academic Advisor and the delivery of ‘study skills’ sessions for first year students as a transition into academic and student life.
  • Lynn Williams, School of Medicine: The adaptation of the Academic Advisor system to the five year, non modularised programme in medicine to cope with placements in the contexts of very a large student body.
  • Liverpool Guild of Students: What does an Academic Advisor look like? Using feedback from students LGoS highlighted key aspects of the role and discussed examples of best practice and how to identify and disseminate further good examples.

Continue reading The Role of the Academic Advisor

Originality in doctoral research – what is it exactly?

Originality is integral to getting a doctorate and there are plenty of articles that try to explain to doctoral candidates exactly what examiners are looking for in the mysterious term ‘originality’.

The video provides an explanation of originality, and a bit more on the rationale for making it and the contributors is shown below.

A doctorate ought to:
  • Be a report of work which others would want to read.
  • Tell a compelling story articulately whilst pre-empting inevitable critiques.
  • Carry the reader into complex realms, and inform and educate him/her.
  • Be sufficiently speculative or original to command respectful peer attention (Winter et al., 2000, p. 36).

Continue reading Originality in doctoral research – what is it exactly?

Thinking Solidarities in a Global World of Difference: The Role of Learning

An international symposium organized collaboratively between the Centre for Lifelong Learning and Cultural Difference and Social Solidarity (CDSS) took place on Thursday 7th March 2013. This symposium involved six presentations that all applied critical perspectives to the theme of education and learning for solidarity.

Professor Lawrence Wilde (University of Nottingham, UK) spoke on ‘Educating for Solidarity’. This paper considered the contributions of three social theorists to the debate about the role of education in fostering solidarity: Alaine Touraine’s ‘school for the subject’; Andre Gorz’s ‘education for autonomy’; and Roberto Unger’s idea of schools for ‘little prophets’.

Continue reading Thinking Solidarities in a Global World of Difference: The Role of Learning