Tag Archives: EdD

The internationalisation of higher education: two recent studies

Universities are becoming increasingly more international, and at a genuinely rapid rate. An earlier report from the British Council highlighted student global mobility and the emergence of transnational higher education as two of the four most significant trends in the sector worldwide. Transnational education involves students studying towards a qualification from another country while staying in their home country.

It is intriguing, though, that internationalisation can occur whether students are willing to travel to another country, and also when they stay at home while another country comes to them, as it were.

Two of the students who have most recently completed the University’s EdD in Higher Education have highlighted a set of ways forward in relation to these two trends. Dr Jason Beckerman graduated in December 2015, and Sally Stafford will graduate at the next opportunity in July 2016.

Study abroad doesn’t need to be for a full year

Dr Jason Beckerman’s research comes at the issue of student mobility from a fascinating angle. He addressed ways in which short term study abroad trips can result in transformative learning for the students concerned. His study focused on students from New York University Abu Dhabi who travelled to Ethiopia and Sri Lanka. It was clear that the trips affected the way in which students oriented themselves to their future endeavours, and helped students to realise that through their studies they were able to make an impact on the wider world.

The report by the British Council indicated that the number of students studying away from their home country increased from 800,000 students in the mid-1970s to over 3.5 million in 2009. While the increase is impressive, it still represents a genuinely modest proportion of the overall number of students in higher education. In fact, the proportion of students with outbound mobility has remained constant since the 1990s at a little over 2% each year. These figures, though, relate to students undertaking relatively long periods of study abroad. Given the importance of understanding across cultures and countries to global society at large, Beckerman’s thesis supports the contention that greater recognition needs to be paid to short-term study abroad. His thesis is available in the University’s research repository.

J Beckerman cropped 2
Dr Jason Beckerman at his graduation ceremony in December 2015.
Integrating transnational ventures into the institution

Meanwhile, a second report from the British Council on the shape of things to come has noted that it is critical that programmes of transnational education are of a high quality. The report observed that transnational education is becoming an increasingly important component of internationalisation.

Sally Stafford’s research thus addresses a key area for the sector, the need for TNE (transnational education) initiatives to contribute to an institution’s internationalisation strategy. Her thesis was entitled ‘Strengthening institutional management of transnational higher education: Implications derived from a thematic analysis of the Cycle 2 audit reports of the Australian Universities Quality Agency’.

In building a broader knowledge base for those responsible for institutional and programmer strategies guiding transnational education initiatives, Stafford identified the importance of aligning transnational education initiatives with overall university mission and objectives. Other lessons that emerged from her research were the importance of integrating the transnational education venture into institutional structure and its governance and management processes. Her thesis will be available from the University’s research repository after her graduation in July.

It is essential that research into higher education explicitly shapes the things that are to come in higher education. And our congratulations go to these two colleagues for their research, and their doctoral qualifications.

Dr Peter Kahn PFHEA

Director of Studies, EdD in Higher Education

EdD residency and graduation

July has been a rewarding month for the Centre for Lifelong Learning and all involved with the EdD. We ran our second residency and celebrated two further graduates from the programme.

The residency is an opportunity for students on the programme to come to see the university, share their experiences and ideas and meet with staff. It is an optional extra as the programme is fully online. Students came from all five continents for four intensive and enjoyable days at the Foresight Centre (pictured above).

Whilst there is plenty to report I think the residency is far better summed up by Gertrude Rompre’s reflections on her experience and on the notion of ‘doctorateness’:

 

Donning the robe of doctorateness: Reflecting on the EdD Residency at the University of Liverpool

I will admit that it is a somewhat vain question: “What will our doctoral robes look like when we graduate from the Online EdD Programme from the University of Liverpool?” On the other hand, perhaps it’s not such a trivial question. As a learner who needs to begin with the end in mind, imagining myself dressed in the appropriate robes, crossing the platform, and hearing my name spoken as the degree of Doctor of Education was conferred upon me, is an important part of my learning process. I need to visualize the end while I am still very near to the beginning. These reflections on the EdD Residency revolve around the ways the residency allowed me to both envision the end but also challenged me to embrace the journey and the present moment, a multi-dimensional approach to doctoral study that, I suspect, is key to success.

Envisioning the end

Paul Ricoeur suggests that “imagination is the power to open to new possibilities, to discover another way of seeing” (Ricoeur, 1995, 281). The EdD Residency served to fuel our collective imaginations as doctoral students. One of the ways this was done was through student presentations and pecha kuchas. Pecha kucha presentations – 20 images described for 20 seconds each – were new to most of the participants. The exercise proved to be a highlight. A format which challenged us to think about our research interests in a concise and creative fashion, the pecha kucha allowed us to exercise the faculty of the imagination and envision our future doctorateness.

The term, ‘doctorateness’, is a strange one. It is a word cobbled together, however, to describe an important process. It points to the deeper reality underlying the doctorate, the fact that we are creating for ourselves a new identity, an identity where we will be addressed as “Dr.” Early on in our doctoral studies, we explored that theme of becoming a doctoral practitioner. It is only now, at the residency, that I am realizing the depth of the transformation into which I have plunged myself. For example, I commented, at dinner, to Dr. Willis how I have noticed faculty colleagues in my own institution engaging with me in a different way now that they know that I am a doctoral student. He reminded me that it was a two-way street and that I, likely, am entering into the dialogue with a new set of vocabulary and contexts as well. Doctorateness is creeping up on me!

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Third Doctorate in Higher Education awarded

The Educational Development Division is delighted to announce our third Doctorate in Higher Education (EdD). Dr Alicia Salaz had a successful viva in April. She works in the library of Carnegie Mellon University – Qatar. Her thesis is titled: International Branch Campus Faculty Member Experiences of the Academic Library.

She used phenomenography to investigate the perceptions and experiences of academic libraries by faculty members across a variety of disciplines working in international branch campuses. The main research question asked how faculty members experience the academic library, with the objective of identifying qualitative variations in experience within this group. The findings of her research addressed established practical problems related to library value and identity, and have implications for practice in both the development and evaluation of library services for faculty members, as well as communication about those services with faculty members.

Alicia acknowledges that:

“Four years ago I was, intellectually, a fundamentally different person” and that the work has represented a “personal transformation”.

Alicia-Salaz

Continue reading Third Doctorate in Higher Education awarded

Principal Fellowship awarded!

The Centre for Lifelong Learning is delighted to announce that Dr Peter Kahn has achieved Principal Fellowship of the University of Liverpool Teaching Recognition and Accreditation (ULTRA) framework and the Higher Education Academy.

Dr Kahn, who works in Educational Development, was awarded the Fellowship by a panel of peers, including an experienced external accreditor. Principal Fellowship is granted in recognition of extensive experience and impact at strategic level in relation to learning and teaching. Through his academic practice, Dr Kahn demonstrated successful leadership to enhance student learning across the University and beyond. His attainment of Principal Fellowship is a significant achievement.

Dr Kahn said:

“I am pleased to have secured this recognition. The panel commented on my thought leadership around educational innovation in higher education, accompanied by spheres of influence to facilitate change in delivery. I am keenly aware that any innovation requires dedication from many people. My attention is particularly taken up now with the University’s professional doctorate in higher education, but I will continue to promote ideas for educational innovation that disrupt and enhance existing practice (see @Peter_Kahn and on LinkedIn)”

ULTRA has been developed to provide an experience-based route to recognition of skills and expertise for any experienced member of staff that teaches or supports learning. Staff can apply to ULTRA in one of four categories, and Dr Kahn will be working alongside colleagues in Educational Development to encourage and support colleagues to apply for Fellowship through the ULTRA Framework.

Further information is available on the Educational Development website, or contact Dr Janis McIntyre at Janis.mcintyre@liverpool.ac.uk

First graduate from the University’s EdD in Higher Education

We are very pleased to have had our first graduate from the EdD, Rev Dr David Taylor, who is also a colleague here in the University.

David graduation single

The University first began its fully-online EdD programme in Higher Education nearly four years ago, in April 2011. The programme is run from here in the Centre for Lifelong Learning, in partnership with Laureate Online Education.

David attended the recent graduations in December in order to receive his doctoral degree. He is certainly highly positive about his experience on the programme, commenting for instance:

“Socially, the highlights have been the discussions and supervision, with friends and colleagues from around the world. Personally I have regained enthusiasm for learning. The biggest challenge has been to reorganise my life to make the space for the EdD – but I still write 3,000 words a week, which I never could before.”

The networking opportunities on the programme are intriguing, as it has attracted educators from more than 40 countries across the world. The participants on the programme come from a wide range of roles within higher education, and include senior institutional leaders, as well as lecturers, administrators and tutors.

Continue reading First graduate from the University’s EdD in Higher Education

First students reach the thesis stage of the University’s EdD

The University launched a fully-online Doctor of Education (EdD) programme in Higher Education in April 2011. Today, a group of 15 students from the first cohort on the programme embark on their practitioner research thesis. Many congratulations to these students who have reached this stage in their studies! The first group includes two members of staff at the University itself.

Each of these students will write a 40,000-50,000 report that chronicles an original piece of practitioner research in higher education. They will each be supported by two supervisors, one of whom is a member of staff at the University. The thesis is expected to take between one and two years for a student to complete.

The online EdD is offered by the University in partnership with Laureate Online Education. There are now around 250 students active on the programme, making it one of the largest EdDs in the country, and the largest such programme that is specifically focused on the study of higher education. Students on the programme come from across the entire world.

Dr Peter Kahn, Director of Studies, EdD

Originality in doctoral research – what is it exactly?

Originality is integral to getting a doctorate and there are plenty of articles that try to explain to doctoral candidates exactly what examiners are looking for in the mysterious term ‘originality’.

The video provides an explanation of originality, and a bit more on the rationale for making it and the contributors is shown below.

A doctorate ought to:
  • Be a report of work which others would want to read.
  • Tell a compelling story articulately whilst pre-empting inevitable critiques.
  • Carry the reader into complex realms, and inform and educate him/her.
  • Be sufficiently speculative or original to command respectful peer attention (Winter et al., 2000, p. 36).

Continue reading Originality in doctoral research – what is it exactly?

Five quick ways to write reflectively

This post is from Lydia Arnold, one of the doctoral candidates on the University’s professional Doctorate in Higher Education (EdD).  Her blogs cover work-based learning, technology, creative assessment, facilitation and research and in this case writing reflectively. Here are five quick points that provide some structure for capturing reflection and adding depth:
  1. Imagine an audience for your musings. It’s hard to write without an audience. Write like you are talking to someone that you trust and connect with, and to extend your thoughts, imagine their probing questions when you hit natural pauses.
  2. Talk, don’t just write. Use voice memos on your phone to capture thoughts in the moment and then write them down when back at base. Some of the most reflective thoughts happen in the car – catch them! This model is effective with adults and children alike.
  3. Use a model. A blank page can be daunting, so use a reflective model to provide a writing frame for your reflections. Gibbs is my favourite but there are others too.
  4. Go beyond describing what happened in an event or situation. Always follow up with the question, so what? (so what … for me, for my students, for my colleagues, for my CPD needs, for my confidence, for my progression , for my efficiency, for my well-being?).
  5. Write quickly, naturally and without concern for prose. This is a first layer of reflection. Then  a) develop the text and tidy it up and b) add comments or text boxes to annotate and add further observations on your initial thoughts. Comments or annotations can add major depth compared to a first attempt – ‘when I wrote this, I was thinking …. And I thought this because … but now I have discussed it with my colleague/friend and have revised my original understanding’ or ‘ I can see the choices I made here were limited by …’. Adding layers to a reflection in this way can be very productive and can help us to question how we see things in the moment.